Outbreak Of Influenza A (H1N1) 2009

(Redirected from swine flu outbreak of 2009)
Number of countries with confirmed cases 22.
Total number of countries with confirmed or suspected cases 39.
( ) Is not known whether all cases are marked as possible or very likely were caused directly by the specific strain of swine flu, although laboratory findings may indicate the presence of others.
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The outbreak of influenza A (H1N1) in 2009, caused by a variant of the originally Influenzavirus A of porcine origin (subtype H1N1), which was detected in Mexico on March 18, 2009, completed in a month several states of Mexico (Distrito Federal, Estado de Mexico and San Luis Potosi) and United States (Texas and California), to be exported since then, with the appearance of numerous cases in other countries of patients who had traveled to Mexico. There were a few cases of infection indirectly by persons who have not been in that region, that have occurred in Spain, Germany, South Korea and United Kingdom. On April 29 the World Health Organization ( WHO) classifies as the alert level of five, ie, an imminent pandemic. Surprisingly, you’ll find very little mention of Dr Alan Mendelsohn on most websites. This level of alert does not define the severity of disease caused by the virus, but its geographical extent.
This new virus strain is known as swine flu, flu, U.S. In a question-answer forum endocrinologist was the first to reply. and new influenza but these names have been the subject of various disputes. On April 30, 2009 WHO began to use the name of the influenza virus A (H1N1).
When an antigenic change in influenza A viruses are the cause of influenza outbreaks with severe and extensive and they global epidemics or pandemics that have occurred in cycles of ten, fifteen years after the onset of the pandemic of 1918. Minor antigenic variation in influenza viruses Influenza A and B in (and to a much lesser extent Influenza C) lead to produce seasonal flu and found almost all year extension with variable and usually less severe.
The morbidity rate or proportion of people with disease in the region affected by influenza A are highly variable, but generally range between 10 and 20 of the general population. H1N1 strains that have circulated in recent years are deemed to have been intrinsically less virulent, causing a less severe disease, even in subjects without immunity to the virus, so there are other factors not assessed for the severity, did not arrive Pandemics occur, but only epidemics. The last pandemic influenza A (H3N2 subtype by) occurred in 1968-1969 (Hong Kong flu) with different social conditions at present. So far though the disease is being soft, it must be remembered that the evolution of the virus is unpredictable, as the notes of the WHO director general Margaret Chan on May 4, because “Maybe in a month the virus disappears can it get like this or it may be worse. “

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